MoL-2009-04: Autistic Number Learning: What Autism Can Tell Us About the Acquisition of Number Concepts

MoL-2009-04: de Jonge, Daan Dirk (2009) Autistic Number Learning: What Autism Can Tell Us About the Acquisition of Number Concepts. [Report]

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Abstract

Autistic Number Learning What Autism Can Tell Us About the Acquisition of Number Concepts Daan Dirk de Jonge Abstract: Autists count differently when compared with typically developing individuals. Autists differ from typically developing individuals in their counting skills by a slower reaction time when naming quantities, a later development of sequencing skills and recalling positions and no benefit from recognizing a canonical placement of dots. In this thesis the typical development of number knowledge, especially counting skills, and the model of working memory is discussed and adapted to explain the autistic number learning. The three major theories about autism: disabilities in theory of mind, executive dysfunction and weak central coherence; and their influence on the autistic counting skills are discussed. A lack of visual-spatial working memory in autists is the most direct explanation for their impaired skills. This weak visual-spatial working memory combined with a strong rote memory could lead autists to develop an alternative number knowledge strategy based on memory

Item Type: Report
Report Nr: MoL-2009-04
Series Name: Master of Logic Thesis (MoL) Series
Year: 2009
Date Deposited: 12 Oct 2016 14:38
Last Modified: 12 Oct 2016 14:38
URI: https://eprints.illc.uva.nl/id/eprint/811

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